The Ridiculous 6 – Bear Film Review

Okay, I’m about to review an Adam Sandler movie. Don’t worry, I’m not one of those elitist movie snobs who says stuff like “Punch Drunk Love was the only decent movie Sandler made,” or “Jack and Jill can suck ma ballz,” because I haven’t seen it, the latter is just creepy and wrong, and because that ain’t true in my book.

The good thing when it comes to Adam Sandler movies is that you know what you’re going to get.

The bad thing when it comes to Adam Sandler movies is… that you know what you’re going to get.

If you’re interested, these are the films I’ve seen of his, and I’ve put them into three groups: the good, the bad, and the ugly (see what I done there? Nope? You will in a minute).

So off the top of my head, we have:

The Good

  1. Mr Deeds
  2. The Waterboy
  3. Punch Drunk Love
  4. Little Nicky
  5. Happy Gilmore
  6. 50 First Dates

The Bad

  1. Grown Ups
  2. Don’t Mess With The Zohan
  3. Mall Cop
  4. Click

The Ugly

  1. Bucky Larson – Born To Be A Star

Before you ask, I watched the majority of these when I was around 14. If I watched them now I might have a different opinion.

Back to Reviewing THIS Film…

So what is this film even about? Well at first, I thought it was going to be a parody of Quentin Tarantino’s H8ful Eight movie – a parody of a film which hasn’t even been released yet – but then I heard this was meant as a parody of the Magnificent Seven, so I guess I was wrong there. Either way, it’s about a group of western folk who come together in search of their long lost daddy. Long lost not because of circumstance, but because it suited the womanising outlaw lifestyle he had grown accustom to.

The story follows Adam Sandler who has grown up in an Indian Tribe. His name in the film is Tommy Stockburn, but he also goes by the name White Knife due to his skills and tendencies using  knifes. In the film he is dressed to look like a Native Indian and has a wife called Smoking Fox. His dad is called Screaming Hawk (or something like that. I forget now). Yes, these are cliches.

After finding his long lost dad by chance, he is told by him that he is dying and that he came to find him so that he can be shown where the hidden money is buried. At this point, a group of men on horses take him away from Tommy so that the dad can show him where the hidden money is buried. Bummer.

Tommy goes into a town with the intention to rob a bank. His plan once he has $50,000 is to give the kidnappers of his daddy the money they crave so that they can be reunited. Along the way his discovers by chance 5 other men, all of whom come from different mothers but all have the same father. His Father!!!!!!

Brothers from another mothers

The biggest problem this movie has is that it meanders in places and feels too drawn out for its type of comedy. The movie DID have a handful of belly laughs in it such as Steve Bucusmi as a Bartender/Dentist, the beginning fight scene where Adam’s character bamboozles a small gang, and some ass jokes from… a literal ass, and if it were to have 30 minutes cut from the movie, I’m sure I would have enjoyed the whole experience a lot more. This could have been a great movie for what it is (obviously it wasn’t made with the aim of nabbing an Oscar from Tom Hanks this year) but unfortunately in certain places, it falls as flat as the desert terrains they journey throughout this movie.

I’ll add here that if you liked early Sandler stuff ala Happy Gilmore, then you may like this film more than a lot of his recent output. You’ve got the lightning-visual gags thrown in sparingly with the quirky crowd people you tend to see in his early films, the romance element his character usually has, and the usual slapstick which makes his movies his own.

Overall, it’s not a great movie, but I think that’s always been the point of his movies – it’s not about greatness, it’s about just having a good time watching it. I’d say it’s worth a watch, but that’s just me. And as for the whole ‘racist’ thing the press was generating about this film – don’t take such a dumb ass film so seriously! There is so many more shocking films out there to huff about. Heck, look at the world right now. Look at the recent events of Paris. Look at Syria! Don’t get distracted in such PR nonsense regarding this film – watch it/don’t watch it, but don’t start political BS over a goofy comedy (but comments are welcome :)).

There isn’t really much else to say about this movie. I won’t spoil it anymore for you if you’re planning on watching it on Netflix anytime soon. I hear he has a contract deal with Netflix, meaning he has agreed to make another 3 more films exclusive to them, so who knows – in about a years time I might be reviewing another film of his.

But until then – take care. X

This would make a lovely postcard, don’t you think?

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Luther (S1 Ep1) – TV Review

Welcome to the first of many instalments of Luther reviews. Having enjoyed this first episode so much, I am confident that I will watch the rest. It’s simply my cup of warm tea. So I hope you enjoy! :))

Right from the get go we know what kind of ride we’re in for – high voltage action and gripping drama. Luther, the star of the show played by Idris Elba, has just cornered a bad guy at the top of a metal structure inside of a crumbling warehouse. The villain is holding a pipe. When he comes at him, the structure collapses underneath his feet and now he is barely holding on with his fingertips from a high, high drop.

From this opening scene, we really see what kind of detective Luther is. He’s one of the good guys for sure, but he isn’t one who is afraid to push the boundaries. In this scene, even though the guy is asking for his help, Luther refuses to with an air of blasé about him. Once he’s gotten the information out of this guy of the whereabouts of the little girl, he tells the police force whom are already inside the home that she is behind the wall, inside of a suitcase. He waits until he can hear the girl breathing (they have to resuscitate her), and then he steps closer to the guy hanging on for dear life. But Luther is not one to show remorse, especially to those whom he considers have no conscious, and so lets the guy fall to his death. His moral mind overrided his law-bidding mind, and the result depending on which side of the fence you’re on, is justice.

What I find brilliant about this introduction to a series is that we, the audience, are thrown straight into the ending of a police case. So kudos to the write (Neil Cross) for not undermining the viewers and demonstrating that he respects our intellect. Cheers.

Even though Luther has a shaky background (and it also hints numerous times that he had suffered some kind of nervous breakdown), he seems back on his feet and is welcomed back into the police force. This means what he was doing before was not what he was ordered to, but something he was dedicated to. It says a lot about what happens to his relationship with his wife, which I’ll get onto in a bit.

Meanwhile, the next case revolves around the murder of two parents and a dead pet dog. No one was at the house at the time and no clues were left. Though their daughter was said to be somewhere else during this period, she is permitted to being interviewed at the station the following day.

Shaken, sleepless, and in shock – this is how Alice, the 18 year old daughter presents herself when being interviewed by Luther at the police station. She appears believable to him for the most part, up until the point where he yawns and leaves the room to get her a cup of tea. Outside the interview room, he tells his colleagues, watching the whole thing unfold on monitors the whole time, that she is the killer. How does he know this? Because she didn’t yawn when he yawned. At this point, it sounded to me that he was clutching at straws, but by the end of interview she had sussed out that he was onto her… and she liked it. Luther anticipated this, having already described her as a narcissist whom craves attention and needs the recognition to be shown how clever she is.

He demonstrates this by breaking into her house and stealing her dog’s urn. Inside the urn is melted bits of the gun which she planted in the dog, knowing fully well the cremation would destroy any fingerprints. Catching up with Luther at the bridge, she thrusts a kitchen knife into his body, but only as a threat, not to plunge in. And this is when he throws the urn into the river, knowing fully well that it was a trophy on her mantelpiece of how much of a criminal mastermind she is. By doing that, it hurt her.

So back to Luther’s personal life, and it is well and truly gone tits up in this arena. Because his wife believes that he hasn’t taken an interest in their relationship in some time, putting his work before them as the priority, she has been seeing someone else for quite some time. And when he comes to visit here in their home (they must have been separated yet we weren’t really told where Luther stays), he starts punching the panels out of the living room door. Yes – she’s finally told him. It’s a tough pill for him to swallow, and by the end of the episode he comes back to the house to tell her that he understands why now, and that he’s sorry. This coming after throwing her new lover out onto the bonnet of a car and the police swinging by.

The girl mastermind between her parents killings is an intriguing watch, not just because she is cold, calculated and twisted, but she is also sexy too. The way she teases Luther such as when he came to her house and she whispered in his ear, and how she puts the ball on the end of her hairpin to her lips seductively whilst scheming about her next move – this turns out to be threatening Luther’s wife outside her work building by holding it to her ear drum – will be interesting to see how this mixture of her odd personality will progress throughout the series. Will Luther fall prey to her charms, having lost his real love? Will loneliness get the better of him and lead him into murky situations? It is possible. The way this girl was studious enough to do her background research on him after their first interview says a lot about how she works. To me this means that once she finds out that the wife and him are well and truly over, she will pounce on this and exploit his weakness.

Until the next Luther episode review, take care. Comments and likes are appreciated :))

Fargo – Season 1, Episode 6 (Review)

The rabbit hole of descent deepens much more for Lester. Waking up in his hospital bed, he is straight away disowned by his brother, who thinks he has something to do with the murders as there is a policeman guarding his door. As the bro leaves, Lester is suspicious as to why there is an officer of the law stood waiting outside his room in the ward. It clicks – they must of found out more information. They must have found out from the nurses that he had a gunshot pellet imbedded in his hand. They must wanna interrogate him more. Drat! Fiddlesticks! He’s well and truly buggered now, isn’t he? So what is Lester supposed to do about the pickle he is in (and lemme tell you – this is a helluva pickle). The answer: he sneaks out the hospital, and back to his home. How does he do this? Well, he dresses up like the fully bandage-faced guy in the bed next to him, and throws that dude under his bed covers (making sure to hide his face), and gets into that guy’s bed. The nurse comes in and moves his bed out of the room, into the hallway, and leaves him there. Now is when Lester makes a break for it, and manages to escape without a trace.


Brotherly love.

But where does he go? What does he have in mind? Dear Lester heads back to his house, past the patch of dried blood in his lounge (just call the specialist cleaners, man) and down into the basement. He notices that the washer-dryer had been moved [by Molly]. But he doesn’t move closer to it – instead, he stands next to the poster which he head butted to knock himself out that (un)faithful day, and pulls it down slightly. Behind the poster, there is a hole in the plasterboard where he had whacked his nogging, and inside the hole is the evidence-in-the-making: the claw hammer Lester used to kill his wife. He then breaks into his younger brother’s house. He plants the hammer in his gun locker, in the basement, along with a pair of his dead wife’s panties, and a picture of his dead wife, scantily clad (the perv!). Lester then sees a picture on the locker of his brother, posing with his wife and son. Instead of feeling guilty and taking back the stuff which he’d planted, he goes into the son’s room, and plants a gun into his school bag. Unbelievable! Lester walks down the stairs, and the son and him see eye-to-eye (he thought no-one was in the house). And the boy doesn’t even seem that bothered. This scene had me cracking up – one of the funnily moments in the series. But to tell you the truth, for a crime show, there’s a lot of them to choose from.


It’s hammer time (again)

Now that Lester is sure the evidence had not been taken, he slips back into his hospital room, switches the man in his bed back into his own, and plonks himself back in it. Someone enters the room, exits, and the most sinister smile of hurrah is etched onto Lester’s face – he thinks he’s gotten away with it. He can still make up more B.S to the police as the have nothing on him, just clues, nothing more.

Lester’s smug shot (later to be his mug shot… so I’m predicting)

So that’s the main portion of this episode covered. What else happens? I shall tell you…

Stavros caves in to the blackmailer’s demands of the 1 million dollars. Lorne, the guy who’s working for him but is also secretly the blackmailer, gets his Turkish friend to speak to Stavros into the phone with instructions as to where to place the money (he uses a device to hide the identity of his phone when on the phone). The Turkish friend is the guy who has been doing the majority of Lorne’s dirty work – supplying him with locust to flood Stavros’s Phoenix Farms shop, the uppers to keep the poor bastard awake all these days, and basically making sure shit gets biblical on his ass. But this friend of Lorne asks for too much – he wants 60% of the million share – and instead, Lorne decides to strap him to a chair, tape a gun to his hands, and let the police shoot him. Serves him right – you should never be too greedy, specially when dealing with a psychopath.


And now you get zero dollars.

Going back to where it all began for him in 1987, Stavros plants the windscreen scraper into the ground, by the wire fence, so that Lorne can find the bag of 1 mil. buried underneath it in the thick snow.

Speaking of snow – man! didn’t it just blizzard like mad near the end of the ep. I mean, they could hardly see a thing. I’m talking about the scene where Mr Numbers and Mr Wretch sandwich Lorne’s car with their own, then start going all guns blazing at him. Lorne runs into the snow fog, and tricks Mr Numbers into going into a wooden building. He does this by slicing the back of his hand, and leading him by a trail of red on the floor (smart if you ask me… but bonkers lets not forget). Mr Number’s number is finally up as Lorne slits his throat, and leaves him gurgling on his own blood, face down in the snow. It’s hard to say where his silent friend, Mr Wretch, has gone to, as we don’t see him after that. But the city officer and Molly quickly come onto the scene and find the three abandoned cars. For one reason or another, they lose sight of each other, and when the city officer sees a body in the fog approaching him, his automatic instinct is to shoot that threat to the ground. He wishes he didn’t, for whom he shot is none other than Molly (i.e. the guy’s an idiot, in my opinion.)


Oh no he didn’t.

So what will happen in the 7th episode? Will Molly live after being shot by an incompetent officer? What will Mr Wretch do after finding his partner has been killed? Does Lorne collect his money with ease, or will something get in his way? And how will Lester worm himself out of this one?

Oh, and one more thing: as Serj Tankian said in a song – “Don’t forget the fish!”…


The day of reckoning is finally over for Stavros (it only cost him a million, and some sleep)


There’s something fishy going on up in Minnesota.

Fargo – Season 1, Episode 2 (Review)

Perhaps there wasn’t as much gore in this episode as in the first one, but it is still intriguing – mainly how on earth Lester is planning on getting Molly the deputy off his back. She’s on to him like a fly on shit, and even though Lester (and even the Sheriff) say to leave her alone, and that she’s harassing him, she is persistent with her questions. Each time Molly meets Lester, he makes some excuse, and initially pretends that he still has double vision. Sheriff, being Lester’s mate, buys this when he is told this, and takes cue to leave the “bereaved” Lester. Trouble is, Lester knows that he did a bad thing.

That Lorne is a creepy character, ain’t he? The way he intimidates people in his one-on-one interactions makes me feel slightly apprehensive, and I’m sat in the safety of my own living room! I’d like to compare him to a bully cat: he stares them out and calls their bluff, throwing in an element of “I’ll-destroy-you-if-you-don’t-get-outta-my-way” in for measure. He did this to the guy in the postal room, and all he was doing was his job. He’s unintentionally hilarious, but perhaps he does have some awareness of his straight-guy comedic act, because when he walks out of that place with his parcel, he tells the cleaner mopping the floor, “You missed a spot.” Oh, and in the parcel we have a book called American Phoenix and a wallet containing his new identity as a Minister.

One criticism: why is Lester allowed back in his house when the crime scene hasn’t been cleared up? There’s puddles of blood and splatterings on the wall – both on the ground floor and in the basement – where the cop and his wife were killed. Or maybe that’s what actually happened, seeing as in both episodes it starts off by telling the viewer that this is based on a true story. (NOTE: I was skeptically of this, so just looked it up… on Wikipedia of all things. Yep: it’s a lie. Just like the movie lied to me; and now I’m a tad depressed as the illusion of that film being based on a real event has just been completely and totally obliterated).

And the episode ended with some guys (below) cutting a hole through the icy ground, and dumping a guy (still conscious) into the freezing water beneath. But if I’m being honest, these characters don’t interest me that much – I’m more interested in the relationship entanglement between Lester, Molly and Lorne. If I’m pushing it, I could say that I like how the ginger haired guy is mute and has to use sign language, and how the guy in the middle (again, see below) has to be his interpretor for people… but that’s it. Oh, and is the guy in the middle one time in Friends? (don’t pretend you didn’t watch that shiz)

…By the way, stay tuned for my review of episode 3, coming to your screen tomorrow… or the next day… or whenever I feel like watching it (I can’t predict the future, or the efforts to not being lazy enough to turn on the TV. Yes, I can be that lazzzzy).

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